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Choosing a Contractor

About 40% of our clients assemble their own shell themselves, many with little construction experience. The Kit panels come marked with numbers and letters to match the Assembly Manual that goes with the building kit. The building plans also have elevation views with numbers and letters. Our best kit assembly success stories are owner builders who read and follow the assembly manual and building plans and call us when they have a question.

If you do not have the time or do not want to assemble the dome shell kit, American Ingenuity can refer you to a Assembly Specialist operating out of Florida.  He will travel to your construction site to supervise your dome shell assembly to the stage where your workers have applied the first layer of concrete in the seams and on your entryways and dormers.  Then either you or your contractor's workers complete the second layer of concrete on your seams and entryways and dormers, applies concrete primer to the dome and paints the concrete.The Kit Assembly Manual that is shipped with the Building Kit gives guidelines for the mixing and application of the concrete, priming and painting of the dome, etc.  To view info about the Specialist, please click on Specialist.

You or your contractor's slab person have the foundation installed. After the shell assembly the subs (plumbers, electricians, drywall finishers, framers, cabinet installers, etc) complete the interior finishing and the installation of your locally purchased doors and windows.

Prior to the availability of this Kit Assembly Specialist to supervise the dome kit assembly, Ai's clients had to hire contractors who generally had never assembled a dome before.  As a result the contractor would tend to over charge because he did not know how long it would take or what problems would arise.  The Kit Assembly Specialist can provide you with references from previous American Ingenuity Domes he has assembled to assure your building kit will be assembled correctly and in a timely fashion. This Specialist would work directly for you or your general contractor as an Independent Subcontractor.  The Specialist charges a daily rate plus travel from his Florida home base to your job site and a return to his home base at the completion of the job. 

If you are interested in using the Kit Assembly Specialist, contact our office at 321-639-8777- Monday through Friday 9-5 eastern time.

A helpful web site is rsmeans.com They sell construction manuals, construction estimating CD's, etc.

 

The methods used for lifting the panels includes:

 

Small cranes that lift 400 to 500 lbs; 25 feet up and 25 feet out, Highlifts (all terrain scissors forklifts often used by roofers).


Monthly rentals on transverse lifts also called Boom Lifts, Horizontal Boom Fork Lifts, Roofing Lifts, Shooters are available from National Rental Chains like US Rentals, Hertz Equipment Rentals, United Rentals, etc. The companies can be found in the telephone book.

 


Choosing a Contractor or Sub-Contractor 

Making a choice: 

There are many considerations when selecting the contracting firm to build your new dome home. To help you make this important choice, find out all you can about contractors in your area.


The more you know, good or bad, the better prepared you will be for a project of this scale and complexity.


If you are building your dome yourself as an Owner-Builder, you will be operating as the contractor and accepting all those responsibilities. This will include making the choice of all the subcontractors who will be working on your dome, such as the electrician, carpenter, and plumber.


If you are building with a construction loan, your lender may require a written contract between you and a licensed contractor, binding both of you until the completion of the job.


Just like people, there are contractors of every type out there – honest and dishonest, good and not so good. If you take the time to be selective you can find one of the great.


While each contractor is reviewing your plans to arrive at an estimate for his work, you will be able to evaluate his nature and characteristics.


With a good and trustworthy contractor, building your home can be one of your most exciting and rewarding accomplishments.


What to look for:

  1. Search the experience of the contractor and talk to previous customers.

  2. Visit his job sites.

  3. A Contractor who:

o Shows an interest in doing something unique.

o Has a positive attitude.

o Is a creative thinker – he looks for solutions rather than complaining about problems.

o Exhibits professionalism in his business.

o Is organized in his work.

o Displays neatness on his job sites.

o Has a good credit history.


What to look out for:

  1. A contractor who promises too much, too quick, for too little. A contractor who says, “Just trust me…..”
  2. A contractor who can’t supply you with names of previous satisfied customers, copies of insurance forms, a permanent business address, or occupational license numbers.
  3. If a contractor is a poor manager and about to go out of business, his credit with suppliers is one of the first places it will show up. Ask where he has credit accounts and call to see if he is in good standing with his suppliers.
  4. If someone gets injured on your property during construction, you will most likely be held responsible for all expenses unless your contractor has Workman’s Compensation Insurance. Check to be sure that he does.

Where to look:

  1. Scan through the yellow pages and their ads, making lots of calls. Approach friends, family, business contacts, and people you work with for recommendations.
  2. Question the building materials suppliers, eg. concrete delivery companies know of reliable subs for foundations.
  3. Inquire of your building official if he has any suggestions.
  4. Check with your Chamber of Commerce or Better Business Bureau.
  5. Contact local chapters of trade organizations such as the National Association of Home Builders. 

By reviewing as many prospects as you can over the phone, and through a process of elimination, you will be able to narrow the list to a few contractors to review your plans for a quote.




Agreeing on payment: 

Because of the uniqueness of this project compared to most projects a contractor has, it will be very difficult for him to determine the exact cost to build your dome. Any experienced contractor has, at one time or another, lost money by bidding a job too low. So if he is not confident of what his costs will be, he will tend to overbid. If he does underbid, once construction begins he will see he is losing money and will start to cut corners, do poor quality work, and try to get out of the job before completion.


He may wish to bid your project on a “cost-plus” contract, in which the contractor charges for the expense of his materials and labor plus a percentage for profit. This is detrimental to you because the more he spends, the more he makes. We recommend a modified “cost-plus” arrangement in which the contractor is paid for his cost plus a predetermined dollar amount for profit. To learn more about determining how to pay your Contractor click on Paying Contractor.


When to pay: 

Financial institutions never pay a contractor until each particular phase of work is completed. If you have the responsibility, and not your mortgage company, to pay the contractor, do the same and only pay the contractor in prearranged installments called draws. For example: 10% or $xxx after the foundation is complete, 10% or $xxx after the shell is complete, etc. If he does not have enough capital or credit to see him through a phase of construction, he is not an established businessman.


Never pay ahead for work that has not been done yet. And always withhold final payment until the entire job is finished and you are happy with the results. That is the best insurance you have to make sure he will return and complete the project.


Make yourself familiar with the lien laws for your state. If your contractor or subcontractor does not pay for the materials used in your house, even if you have paid him for those materials, the supplier may be able to place a Mechanic’s Lien upon your property, requiring you to pay them also. To learn more click on Mechanic's Lien.


Contracts:

  1. Be sure everything that is important to you and everything you expect is written into a contract.
  2. We recommend you have a detailed, written understanding of the contractor’s responsibilities, what he is to do, and the items that are to be included. This can be done in an informal manner and can simply be an itemized list of what the contractor agrees to do and when, what you agree to do and when, and how much he will be paid and when.
  3. Include a general statement that all work will be done in a professional manner.
  4. If you have the option, we recommend an agreement which will allow either party some opportunity to back out or renegotiate the remainder of the jobs to be completed. If your contractor really wants out of the job, it is in your best interest to let him go. If you are dissatisfied, this will also provide you with an escape clause. It is not uncommon to change contractors during construction of any home.
  5. To encourage the contractor to complete the project in a timely and cost effective manner, include rewards for finishing early and below the estimated cost.
  6. Include a provision to reduce his profits for significant overruns and delays.
  7. A contract that rewards the contractor for good and productive service is the objective.
  8. Be sure both of you sign and date the contract. Keep a signed copy for yourself in a safe place where it is accessible when you need to refer to it.


 
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